HealthONE - April 22, 2020

With so many things to do to prepare for the arrival of a new child, we understand that soon-to-be-moms have plenty of questions around pregnancy during the coronavirus. The need to stay safe and healthy is incredibly important, but can feel doubly important when you’re caring for two.

Although it is critical to follow current guidelines around sanitation during the coronavirus, the amount of sanitizing to prevent the spread of the virus has some women wondering if there’s a cause for concern while pregnant. At HealthONE, our goal is to ensure our patients feel informed and supported, especially during times like these.

Below are some additional resources on staying safe during the coronavirus while pregnant.

For additional information about being pregnant during the coronavirus, visit one of our OB/GYNs by scheduling an appointment online.

Using hand sanitizer while pregnant

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of the coronavirus is to clean your hands often. This recommendation has led to hand sanitizer flying off the shelves in grocery stores and pharmacies across the country. But with an increase in sanitizing, expectant mothers are asking if they should be concerned about the overuse of hand sanitizer.

The Food and Drug Administration currently states that hand sanitizer is safe for expectant mothers to the best of their knowledge, but have started additional research on some of the ingredients to be certain. They are currently working to ensure that the benefits outweigh any of the potential risks.

Alternatives to hand sanitizer

Although hand sanitizer has shown to be generally safe for both mom and baby, in addition to an effective way to clean your hands, it is not the CDC’s first recommendation. In fact, washing your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds is the best option for hand cleaning.

Hand washing reduces the amount of all chemicals and germs on the hands, where hand sanitizer only reduces the amount of some germs. The bottom line? Hand sanitizer is a safe and effective option while on the go, however, at home, soap and water are the top choice to make sure hands are clean and germs don’t spread. Soap and water is much gentler on the skin and is also very safe for pregnant women.

Using cleaning products while pregnant

In addition to cleaning our hands, the CDC also recommends disinfecting your home, particularly after you have been in a public space such as the grocery store or a doctor’s office. Surfaces that are important do disinfect regularly, include:

  • Doorknobs
  • Countertops
  • Light switches
  • Handles
  • Phones
  • Faucets
  • Sinks

Cleaning these surfaces, or other high traffic areas after outside exposure, can reduce the risk of someone in your family catching or spreading the disease.

Products approved to combat coronavirus

In order to ensure these surfaces are properly disinfected, it is important to follow the CDC guidelines for approved cleaning solutions.

These include:

Most of these products are currently considered safe for cleaning and disinfecting while pregnant. If expectant mothers are looking to take extra precautions, they can use gloves while cleaning, as many of the concerns about using products would be from skin absorption.

At the end of the day, the most important thing is that both mother and baby are safe. At this moment in time, that means following the current CDC guidelines on cleaning and sanitizing to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Of course, the most effective way to prevent contracting the virus is through not coming in contact with it, which means social distancing as much as possible.

At HealthONE, we are constantly reevaluating our safety measures to ensure the best possible experience for mother and child, even during difficult times. Through increased awareness and following recommendations, we can do our best to ensure that families stay healthy and safe.

April 22, 2020
Learn about social isolation effects on new mothers and postpartum depression resources available in Denver during the coronavirus pandemic.
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